Gibberish 
As a kid I remember my friends and I occasionally pretending to talk other languages that we had heard but didn't actually understand. Basically, we would recreate similar phonetic sounds to the foreign language but not actual meaningful words. If a school teacher caught you doing this, you risked being scolded for being culturally insensitive. However, I wondered isn't it equally likely that other cultures do the exact same thing with English? If everyone does it then it's not so bad, right? (Famous last words.)

A few months ago, I happened across a Youtube video where a guy ponders what it might actually sound like to hear a non-English speaker talking in English gibberish. He challenges other Youtubers to provide a video example, and he also gives several examples of gibberish in different languages he has heard. Check it out here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6C5EZmyJ9ik

If you follow the 'related links' to the video, you can find some responses. There are a couple decent ones mixed in with some garbage. However, a friend of mine just recently sent me this next video that is from an Italian musician that made a gibberish English rock song. It's quite entertaining and the best example I think.

http://boingboing.net/2009/12/17/gibber ... -song.html

[edit update for broken link above]
Adriano Celentano & Raffaella CarrĂ  - Prisencolinensinainciusol

You can hear a few actual words that the musician likely had overheard from English songs. Honestly, I think I can understand the gibberish song better than some recent songs released in the states. :)


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